Venn Librarian

Reflections about the intersection of schools, libraries and technology.

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Archive for September, 2015

Where to draw the line

Posted by lpearle on 17 September 2015

If you work in a school you are a mandated reporter: you must report suspected child abuse or neglect.  Many schools include students drinking in that definition, even if the parents are aware and supporting.  Now, many time the parents are trying to be the “cool” parent and allowing a kegger in their home.  But many Jewish families allow their children to drink wine on Shabbat or Pesach.  Many French and Italian families allow their children to drink wine as part of dinner.  So, the question is how do you draw the line as a mandated reporter?

Here’s the scenario some of us face: we’re at an event – say, a family wedding or a gathering of old friends – and see underage drinking.  It’s not our house, it’s not our event, but is it our responsibility?  Some schools would say yes, others take a more nuanced view.

It comes into play when we’re on social media, too.  MPOW’s rule is that we cannot connect with students until they’ve been out of school for five years.  MFPOW had no rule beyond “use your common sense” (assuming, of course, we have some).  But what if you have a teenager and their friends want to connect with you?  Or you’re friends with your nieces and nephews, or the children of friends?  Or you’re abiding by that five-year rule and those new former student/friends have younger siblings… And there, in a post or tweet or pin or something else, you see something you would, in the normal course of your work, have to report.

It’s a tricky line.  Do you decline invitations to events where you know (or strongly suspect) that underage drinking will take place? Do you just bite your tongue, knowing that it’s not your event or responsibility?

Just a little something to think about as the Jewish holidays pass, as families and friends start to talk about winter gatherings, and possibly even plan for the spring and summer.

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Minor Musings

Posted by lpearle on 11 September 2015

Still digitally decluttering…

Books, Reading, etc.

  • One challenge at MPOW is getting the middle school students into the library (time, distance, lack of discrete space are issues).  So we’re thinking about the pop-up library.

School Life

Tech Stuff

  • This was done with sixth graders, but could easily scale to any middle or upper school class.
  • This is of Allentown, but imagine creating a history or English class project (I know I’ve suggested this before… hoping this year a teacher takes me up on it!).  And how cool it would be to integrate the Newseum into your resources? or a Digital Timeline?
  • MPOW is a GAFE/Schoology school, and Videonot.es looks like it would be a great tool to use!
  • Right now, we’re BYOD (so have computer labs) – Doug has great ideas about 1:1.
  • This list of tools is a great starter toolkit!
  • It’s the start of a new school year.  Why not declutter your laptop before things get crazy?

Etcetera

And, as always, Will Richardson has some great ideas about trends we should be watching.  Something to ponder as the school year starts.

Posted in Books, Collection Development, Conferences, Privacy, School Libraries, Student stuff, Techno Geekiness | Leave a Comment »

Creating Communities

Posted by lpearle on 7 September 2015

The past couple of weeks (ish) I’ve been immersed in New Faculty Orientation and Opening Faculty Meetings, getting to know my new colleagues and new environment.  Each school is different, obviously, and getting to know and appreciate the culture and the traditions can take time.  In part that’s because there are unwritten rules, and in part it’s because every time people leave and new people arrive things change.  At MPOW there’s a special position (an endowed chair, actually) with the responsibility for helping new faculty socialize and get to know colleagues and each other outside the confines of the classroom and dining hall – that’s never happened at my previous schools, although some have had similar unofficial “ambassadors”.

I’ve been thinking a lot about corporate culture at schools and how that can shift over time.  Whenever there’s a large change in faculty, that culture shifts.  There’s also a shift when a division head or head of school changes: I’ve worked with heads who have a very open door policy and those who are virtually never available without an appointment.  I’ve worked with touchy-feely heads, and those who are more reserved.  One had a great in person manner but on paper was far sterner.  Of course that head’s style then trickles down, and a head who hides and is less than transparent in how things are decided and done usually hires or promotes people who follow that methodology; when that head leaves and a new, more transparent outgoing head arrives is usually the start of others finding a good reason to perhaps explore other career paths.

We spend a lot of time as faculty talking about blended classrooms and individual learning styles and diversity.  So many schools have alliance or affinity groups (or whatever the terminology is) and carefully create “safe spaces” for all.  And many have ceremonies or convocations that start the year as a united community. At my last school, we celebrated those still at school for their accomplishments, giving both new faculty and new students a sense of the community they’re joining. But when all that is over, what happens? At least one quarter of every high school is new every year – and yes, some may know each other from previous schools or groups, but as a unified class they’re new.  How do we get them to see each other as a group when we’re also teaching them to celebrate their differences?

Just something to ponder as the school year commences.

(apologies for the rambling – this was so much clearer and coherent when I thought it out late last night…)

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Who’s your lollipop?

Posted by lpearle on 4 September 2015

Yesterday, our Dean of Students met with the new faculty and started by showing this TEDx talk:

I’ve seen it before, but now, as then, I thought about my lollipops and whether I’ve actually thanked them.  There are a few I plan to reach out to and thank in the near future… there are others who, sadly, cannot be thanked.

Go thou and do likewise.  And be aware how you, too, might be someone’s lollipop.

Posted in Life Related | Leave a Comment »

Setting Limits

Posted by lpearle on 1 September 2015

As the school year starts, many of us will be having conversations with our students about setting limits and making choices: no, you can’t take 6 AP level classes… if you’re going to be a 3-season athlete, maybe playing the lead in the school play isn’t going to happen… practicing piano 8 hours a night might cut into your homework time… etc. (all conversations I’ve had with students over the years).  We do a great job at working with them on self-care, on learning how to identify relationships that aren’t healthy, how to start to manage their time and commitments well.

But what about us? I’m something of a believer in “when many people are mentioning something, pay attention” and over the past few months I’ve read more about the book Essentialism, so I placed a hold on it from my library.  One of the criticisms I read was that it is a bit heavy-handed in terms of its examples and solutions, but that beneath that it has some pearls of wisdom.  We’ll see.  I’ve read The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up, which provided a lot of inspiration for cleaning out my home, and I’m hoping that this can give me ideas for how to deal with what’s essential in my life (ok, I know what is, but sometimes we all need ideas for how to explain why this is, and that isn’t).

Starting at a new school, with new staff, faculty and students to meet and get to know, with new curriculum to deal with, with new committees on which to serve, plus a new town and area to explore (and in which to find a new butcher, baker, candlestick maker, among others) means that there will be a lot of pulls on my time.  At my last school, there were also demands on my time and I’m not sure I handled them well – the goal is to do better now.

Saying “no” gracefully but firmly is a skill that we need to teach ourselves and model for students. After all, can they really take us seriously if we keep saying, “you have to set limits” but never seem to do that for ourselves?

Posted in Musings, Student stuff | Leave a Comment »